Dr. Haynes invited to speak at UC Irvine

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Dr. Haynes has been invited to the University of California Irvine to present a talk entitled “In Vitro Development of Chromatin-based Biologics for Breast Cancer” for the UCI Biomedical Engineering Lecture Series on Friday, October 20, 2017 in the McDonnell Douglas Engineering Auditorium (MDEA).

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Dr. Haynes invited to help chart paths of synthetic biology in Paris

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CRI_ParisDr. Haynes has been invited by scientists at the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity (CRI) to speak at “Charting Future Paths of Open Synthetic Biology” in Paris, France. She will present a talk entitled “Engineering the human genome as chromatin” and participate in advising a strategy (white paper) for the recruitment and support of research fellows in synthetic biology. The invitation to this important international event was given in recognition of Dr. Haynes’ participation at the leading edge of synthetic biology and her high-impact contributions to the field.

PhD Defense – Congratulations to Rene Daer

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Rene_PhD_defenseBiological Design PhD student Rene Daer just successfully defended her thesis “Expanding Applications of Portable Biological Systems: Enhancements to Mammalian Gene Editing and Bacterial Quorum Sensing” today at 3 – 5 pm in Biological Design Auditorium B. Thank you to all of the friends, family, and colleagues who came to show their support.

This day is especially exciting since Dr. Rene Daer will my (Dr. Haynes’) first PhD graduate. On behalf of the Haynes lab, I hope this training experience launches a fun and fruitful career!

Haynes Lab Members to Present Research at Fall 2017 EBRC Retreat

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ebrc_logo3Haynes lab members Alyssa Henning, Ben Nyer, and Dr. Karmella Haynes will be presenting research at a 2017 Fall Retreat organized by the Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC). The retreat will take place at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, GA September 22 – 23, 2017. EBRC members include some of the most prestigious labs in synthetic biology. Attendees will come from academic, industry, and government institutions from across the country.

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News: Haynes lab grad student Alyssa Henning gets creative with science outreach

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Alyssa Henning at Saboten Con, September 2017.

Haynes lab PhD student Alyssa Henning (Biological Design) recently participated in local Comic Con and cultural events in Phoenix. The first event was Phoenix Comic Con on May 25 – 28 where she was invited to talk about real-life science as a panelist. At a Japanese pop culture event called Saboten Con (September 4), Alyssa and the Sun Devil Taiko club (of which she is an officer) won an award for their musical performance.

Sun Devil Taiko also performed at Culture Fest on Tuesday, August 15th. You can watch a recorded performance of Ogi Matsuri and Taiko Bayashi online.

 

 

 


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Research – bioRxiv Pre-print – Activation of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer cells by a synthetic chromatin effector

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Activation of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer cells by a synthetic chromatin effector
Olney KC, Nyer DB, Wilson Sayres MA, Haynes KA. (2017) bioRxiv. http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/09/07/186056

Certain types of breast cancer can be difficult to treat because breast cancer cells in different patients are not completely identical. Here, we measured the expression levels of genes in drug responsive and non-responsive (triple-negative) lab-grown breast cancer cells. In agreement with findings from other research groups, we observed that certain groups of genes are commonly or differentially expressed. Importantly, a large group of genes is silenced in breast cancer cells compared to less cancerous cells. In cancers, certain overactive proteins silence genes by inducing tight chromatin packing. We used a synthetic fusion protein called PcTF to bind and disrupt cancer-associated gene silencing. Dozens of genes, including fifteen different anti-cancer genes became activated in all of the cancer cell types, including the triple-negative cells. PcTF has the potential to act as a powerful therapeutic protein (biologic) that activates multiple anti-cancer genes at once.

News: “Soft” Side of Bioengineering Poised to Make Big Impacts

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ASU Full Circle recently highlighted the emerging Molecular, Tissue, and Cellular Bioengineering (MCTB) community at ASU and the second annual MCTB Symposium, co-chaired by Karmella Haynes.

J. Kullman, 07.27.17, ASU Full Circle: There are more technically precise descriptions of what’s at the core of a growing trend broadening the horizons of biomedical engineering than “the soft, squishy side of bioengineering.” But Karmella Haynes and Kaushal Rege still like the way that sums up what they and about 20 other Arizona State University faculty members are increasingly focusing on in their research and teaching.”

Read more at ASU Full Circle.